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MY CHINA PLUS is the first Virtual Warehouse all-in-one to distribute on Chinese / Asian markets in an easy, effective and economical way in Shanghai New Free Trade Zone.

The solution, based on Food & Beverages distribution platforms activities and experience, is designed for manufacturers / distributors who wish to have direct support in their business operations, promotion and distribution also without the need for a corporate presence in China.

How does My China B2B PLUS?

  • 1) SETUP: with My China B2B support, the company defines the space and the type of products that will store (temperature controlled, Fresh, Frozen)

NB: The warehouse is into the Shanghai FREE TRADE ZONE. This allows that stored products to pay duties and taxation only when they have been sold!

  • 2) SEND PRODUCTS: The company sends by sea the items to be stored in the warehouse in China.
    • For products without Chinese labeling:
      • Simultaneously with the product sending, are activated for the incoming products, the procedures with the Chinese authorities for obtaining the Chinese labels.

      • Upon arrival and during storage, products labeling  with Chinese labels

NB This allows to sell immediately the products on the Chinese market (competitive advantage - Ready to Sell) and also be used in fairs / exhibitions as Chinese products, with a big reduction of costs if the same products are shipped from their own country to the same exhibition (about 800 € every 100 kg).

  • 3) MANAGEMENT: Remote monitoring of Virtual Warehouse Platform by My China B2B PLUS Tools.
    • Movement Managing of the stored goods  (in / out)
    • Transfer / transport to other Chinese locations and Asian nations (for fairs, events, sales).
    • Tours of potential buyers (Showroom) to touch the stored products before buy.
    • My China Desk support for all logistics management activities and business relationships with potential buyers / distributors
    • Storing also in other Chinese locations (as needed)

Benefits for MY CHINA PLUS customers :

  • Only one point of contact in english / chinese language for all procedures (logistics, distribution, commercial) and documentation (invoices, documents, etc. ..)
  • Cutting costs (and time) about fairs, exhibitions, workshops and tasting organization, sending samples / products in China and neighboring Asian countries (Hong Kong, Singapore, Japan, Korea etc ...) .
  • "READY TO SELL" competitive advantage directly in China for your business
  • No tax: Stored goods Taxation only when really sold
  • Chinese Labels: Quick management for Chinese product labels
  • Simplified management of your distributors directly in China and multi / distributors with a single national stock
  • Pay per Use for your warehouse in China
  • Showroom activity for buyers product overview and tasting
  • Transparent management of all steps
  • Monitoring direct from your own country

Choose "the PLUS" more appropriate for your distribution needs in China and Asia!

For information or contact: [email protected]

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Friday, 18 January 2019
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My China B2B
 

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About My Company
My China B2B Cloud Edition is the first interactive network of Business Centers specialized for B2B.

Combining the expertise and presences of a real networks of Business Centers in different countries with the updated Digital Communication and Telecommunication technologies, My China B2B permit to the Small & Medium companies and organizations, to manage their business worldwide, easily and faster.

Using My China B2B Hubs as concrete support to enter in the European and Chinese markets and the over 150.000 certificated enterprises, now the companies can be pragmatically supported in all the procedure and activities directly on their target markets and permit them to have a real all-in-one presence abroad, easy to manage.

Business Contact Information

Address
Chong Hing Finance Center 12 Floor - 288 Nanjing West Road
State
Shanghai
City / Town
Shanghai
Country
China
Website
http://www.mychinab2b.net

Business Informations

Your Primary Business Type
Service - Consulting
Your Primary Industries
Services
Main Markets
North America
South America
West Europe
Africa
Eastern Asia
Western Asia
Oceania
Middle East
Certification
No Certfication

Recent activities

myblog

BEXPON is the first full-channels market fair in China, which empowers you with a no-stop 365 days commercial activity and multi-channel, multi-events distribution - optimization and saving - suitable for Companies that already operate in China or plan to.

BEXPON is the Exhibitions Market Center of the Chinese Company Shanghai Yiduqiao, which manages all the necessary formalities and activities with its own licences for import, distribution, e-Commerce, logistics, wholesales and retail sales, in a goal-oriented Win-Win partnership with the participating Companies.

READ MORE

645 days ago
myblog

[email protected] is the first full-channels market fair in China, which empowers you with a no-stop 365 days commercial activity and multi-channel, multi-events distribution - optimization and saving - suitable for Companies that already operate in China or plan to.

[email protected] is the Exhibitions Market Center of the Chinese Company Shanghai Yiduqiao, which manages all the necessary formalities and activities with its own licences for import, distribution, e-Commerce, logistics, wholesales and retail sales, in a goal-oriented Win-Win partnership with the participating Companies.

645 days ago
myblog
645 days ago
myblog

Yiduqiao (Qiao Lab Group) extends its distribution channel and sales opening its iStore in Yiducity activating own BE-Locations (Business Places) in 166 major Chinese cities.

"Now with 1-Click our iStore can be reached directly from Yiducity Mobile APP by any Chinese user ", declares Yuan Wei Hong, Yiduqiao Managing Partner , " and put in direct connection with our Brands, events, promotions, offers and products around to him/her".

Yiducity (http://yiducity.com) is the distribution platform O2O (Online-Offline) of the chinese e-commerce company's Yiduqiao (Qiao Lab Group).

"With the new iStore activation in Yiducity, now we can manage more effective and incisive direct actions to B2B distribution and retail users (B2C),as well as create Club of users and group buying, professional and retail for International Brands".

Yiducity iStore allows International Brands and companies that already distributed in China, as well as those which intend to do, to have an effective channel in support of their presence and development on the market.

"In 1-click and a single page, we can show to the Chinese consumer, selected Brand experiences 'around him/her' ", continues Yuan Wei Hong, "building the shopping experience where he/she is in that moment, or alternatively, as a special feature of Yiducity, moving the buying opportunity where are they located.".

"From mobile or pc, chinese consumer can buy a Brand by e-commerce or in cross-border with shipping directly from abroad or to know where to buy it around him (shops and supermarkets) or in which restaurants, hotels or taste corners near to him can try it, as well as to interact with the coupons, buying groups, activities and events related to that Brand / Product".

And about the entrance fee for a Brand in Yiducity iStore? "Very low", said Yuan Wei Hong,"in fact it's only necessary to activate the Brand - Business account on Yiducity(100€)"....... (more on Yiducity iStore)

For more information

1263 days ago
myblog
1428 days ago
myblog

WITH export markets in the grips of a global slowdown, domestic wages rising and bank financing hard to come by, China's smaller, mostly privately-owned businesses are struggling to survive.

Nowhere is that more evident than in Zhejiang Province southwest of Shanghai, one of the nation's cradles of small enterprise.

The province is home to an estimated 3 million small and medium-sized businesses, which are generally defined as companies with under 300 employees.

"It's not just a bottleneck we're facing; it's a matter of life or death," said Andy Jin, the second generation of what started as family-owned textile business in Tonglu County.

Jin said the business once ranked among China's top 500 small and medium-size enterprises (SMEs), making apparel for global brands such as Burberry and Guess. In 2006, his father, sensing that such manufacturing was going to hit tougher times, sold the clothing factory and the family became garment industry middlemen.

"Trading with our European customers continued," Jin explained. "We take orders from overseas and look for the right companies to fill them. We became a reseller instead of a manufacturer, and it was a good decision because making clothes for big brands is no longer very profitable. I know factories out there that are barely surviving."

Boost productivity

The Jins' transition into the service industry may not be the norm for the troubled smaller firms in Zhejiang.

Becoming a wholesale agent is not all that expensive because investment in heavy equipment isn't necessary. But exiting manufacturing can be problematical because there are few takers for factory sales nowadays.

So what's left for small manufacturers with their backs against the wall?

Li Yang, deputy dean of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, said one solution would be to improve the productivity of factories and help them move up the value chain.

"People think 'transformation' only means shifting to the services industry, but that's an outdated idea," Li wrote in a commentary published two weeks ago. "I think 'transformation' means improvement in production efficiency."

"Latin American countries have service-intensive economies, but they still have fallen into the middle-income trap, stuck in no longer competitive export markets due to rising wages. They are still behind advanced economies that produce high-value goods because they rushed into the services industries with low efficiency," he added.

Li suggests that the business climate would be greatly improved in China if the government moved to the back seat and let markets do the driving.

"Let the market decide," he wrote. "No preferential policies from the government. We have learned lessons from the government making decisions instead of the market."

Li gave one example

"In the 1980s the government decided to restrain the development of the leather industry due to possible oversupply," he wrote. "But people were still pulled into the industry by the lure of considerable profits. Then the profits were gradually diluted by competition, and through the process, the leather industry has become a major industry."

But attaining efficiency and higher productivity can be costly. Small manufactures need to hire more skilled workers and buy advanced machinery. Where is the money?

OEM plants suffer

"The original equipment manufacturing (OEM) factories in China have thin profits, and they are starving for cash to pay their workers and rents," Jin said. "They have very limited resources to undergo transformation. If you don't have a guarantee for a bank loan, you go to peers who are willing to use their assets to guarantee your repayments to the banks. But even a good buddy won't do it free for you. So you also cover for him when he's in trouble."

A network of mutual guarantees between companies has become commonplace in Zhejiang, often with bitter results.

Huang Jian, chairman of a famous leather producer in Zhejiang, fled with more than 1 billion yuan (US$158 million) in debts in May. The Industrial and Commercial Bank of China had lent his company 50 million yuan, with two other companies in Hangzhou providing a joint loan guarantee.

Lenders regard small businesses with great skepticism. Webs of companies covering loans for one another have pushed up bad loans. Risk aversion among banks has resulted.

Yang Xiaoping, former director of the Zhejiang office of the China Banking Regulatory Commission, has urged the government to take a page from the experience of other countries.

"Small business financing is an international challenge," Yang wrote in a commentary published two weeks ago. "It's a common practice around the world for governments to establish credit guarantee systems for small businesses to assist them with getting bank loans."

Beyond financing, smaller businesses often need advice on how to manage their businesses more effectively.

At the China International Consumer Goods Fair in Ningbo in June, an annual event sponsored by the Ministry of Commerce and the Zhejiang provincial government, special booths were set to draw smaller companies and lenders together.

"The business owners had direct communication with financial institutions and received free consultation about sustainable development and healthy capital flow," said a fair spokesman.

Jin remains skeptical. He said many of his customers are shifting orders to cheaper markets like Vietnam and Pakistan.

"Good decision-making is important for businesses," he said, "but all too often it comes from hard-learned lessons."

2383 days ago
myblog

THE number of Chinese companies in the Fortune 500 global list continues to rise after it hit a record high and surpassed the number of Japanese firms for the first time last year.

The Fortune 500 list for 2012, released yesterday, names 79 Chinese companies, 10 more than in 2011 and the ninth consecutive year the figure has risen, according to Fortune magazine.

Among them, 69 are based in the Chinese mainland, four are from Hong Kong and six from Taiwan.

Three Chinese enterprises - Sinopec Group (5th), China National Petroleum Corp (6th) and State Grid Corp of China (7th) - remain in the top 10.

Netherlands-based Royal Dutch Shell, which ranked No. 2 last year, replaces Wal-Mart Stores to lead the rankings, followed by Exxon Mobil and Wal-Mart.

There are 132 US companies and 68 Japanese enterprises on this year's list. The number of US firms declined from 133 last year and its record high of 197 in 2002. The number of Japanese firms remains 68.

The Fortune Global 500 list tracks annual revenues of the world's biggest companies.

Apple Inc is 55th in the list, compared with 111th in 2011, thanks to booming sales of iPads and iPhones.

Lenovo Group Ltd, China's biggest personal computer maker, ranked 370th in the list, up from 449th the previous year.

2383 days ago
myblog


Cookies, tissues, detergents draw least allegiance

Faced with a multicolored array of packets on the supermarket shelf, Li Weili had difficulty deciding which brand of detergent she wanted.

Suddenly, one with the words "Buy one and get one free" caught her eye, and she put it in her cart.

"I was overwhelmed by the number of brands on the shelf," says Li, 55. "The simplest thing to do was to go with the one that had a deal on it."

Li is not the only shopper who has struggled to choose a brand when shopping for daily necessities. According to a recent survey, Chinese consumers exhibit little brand loyalty toward goods that tend to be used up quickly, even though they buy such goods frequently.

The study, named the 2012 China Shopper Report, conducted by Bain & Company, an international business consulting firm, and Kantar Worldpanel, a provider of consumer research, dispels several misconceptions about how Chinese shoppers respond to product brands.

The researchers in the study divided shoppers' behavior into two categories, "loyalist" and "repertoire". Interviewing shoppers from 40,000 households in urban China, they found that the vast majority tend to exhibit repertoire behavior, meaning they do not stick to one brand when shopping for the goods they buy most frequently.

Shoppers showed the least loyalty to individual brands of cookies, fabric detergent, juice and facial tissue.

The findings also suggested that Chinese customers tend not to be entirely forthcoming when talking about their shopping habits.

More than 60 percent of the respondents said they first look at brands when trying to decide what products they want to buy. But, when it comes to making a purchase, other considerations take on greater importance, the study said.

"Marketers must pay attention to what Chinese shoppers do, not what they say in the survey," Bruno Lannes, partner of Bain & Company, says.

"Otherwise, they risk spending money on trying to drive behaviors that simply are not possible in this market."

The survey looked at the 26 categories of consumer goods that are most commonly sold in China, including packaged foods, beverages and personal care and home-care products. Barcode scanners were used to track the respondents' purchases.

"Chinese shoppers are pampered by having an abundance of brand choices," says Jason Yu, general manager of Kantar Worldpanel China. "Hence it is increasingly difficult for big brands to stand out from the clutter.

"It is essential for marketers to understand the nature of the categories they are competing in and make the right growth plans."

Lannes says brands that are likely to enjoy the least loyalty should run TV commercials inside stores and use similar methods to remind shoppers of their products.

Sun Tianzhen, spokeswoman for Hsu Fu Chi International Ltd, a confectionery maker, says the findings can give companies hints about how to become stronger competitors.

"Chinese people show a lot of variety in their food tastes," she says. "To inspire shoppers with brand loyalty, you have to constantly improve the quality of the food you are selling and introduce new products with fresh flavors."

Sun says it is very important to communicate with shoppers when they are in stores. To that end, the company has set up television screens in stores to inform shoppers about its production lines and food safety.

Strong loyalty

Chinese shoppers also exhibit strong brand loyalty when they buy infant formula, diapers, milk, beer, carbonated soft drinks and chewing gum, the study found.

Wang Jing, the mother of a 1-year-old, always purchases the same foreign brand of formula milk and same brand of diapers.

"There might be a risk in trying a new brand of milk powder or new brand of diapers," says Wang, 33. "As long as my son is comfortable with what he's using now, I'm not going to switch."

Another Bain study looked at shoppers who routinely buy infant products and found there was often no compelling reason to change brands. Babies, it explained, are incapable of opining about a product and mothers tend to think that continually using the same brand benefits their child's health.

For that reason, a company should try to ensure that shoppers are familiar with its brand as soon as they start shopping for a particular product.

And the strategy should be similar for companies that sell goods for which brand loyalty tends to be stronger. They also should try to encourage shoppers to try their brands first and try to ensure that their brands are easy to find in stores, Lannes says.

"Winning brands are those that are better at attracting new shoppers day-in and day-out, and that keep increasing the number of shoppers who buy their goods," he says.

Lin Shuang, a maker of traditional Chinese dresses, says she dislikes change.

"If I find a brand I like, I stay with it," she says. "But most of the time, people are forced to change brands because they aren't satisfied with what they are buying now."

 

2384 days ago
myblog


Cookies, tissues, detergents draw least allegiance

Faced with a multicolored array of packets on the supermarket shelf, Li Weili had difficulty deciding which brand of detergent she wanted.

Suddenly, one with the words "Buy one and get one free" caught her eye, and she put it in her cart.

"I was overwhelmed by the number of brands on the shelf," says Li, 55. "The simplest thing to do was to go with the one that had a deal on it."

Li is not the only shopper who has struggled to choose a brand when shopping for daily necessities. According to a recent survey, Chinese consumers exhibit little brand loyalty toward goods that tend to be used up quickly, even though they buy such goods frequently.

The study, named the 2012 China Shopper Report, conducted by Bain & Company, an international business consulting firm, and Kantar Worldpanel, a provider of consumer research, dispels several misconceptions about how Chinese shoppers respond to product brands.

The researchers in the study divided shoppers' behavior into two categories, "loyalist" and "repertoire". Interviewing shoppers from 40,000 households in urban China, they found that the vast majority tend to exhibit repertoire behavior, meaning they do not stick to one brand when shopping for the goods they buy most frequently.

Shoppers showed the least loyalty to individual brands of cookies, fabric detergent, juice and facial tissue.

The findings also suggested that Chinese customers tend not to be entirely forthcoming when talking about their shopping habits.

More than 60 percent of the respondents said they first look at brands when trying to decide what products they want to buy. But, when it comes to making a purchase, other considerations take on greater importance, the study said.

"Marketers must pay attention to what Chinese shoppers do, not what they say in the survey," Bruno Lannes, partner of Bain & Company, says.

"Otherwise, they risk spending money on trying to drive behaviors that simply are not possible in this market."

The survey looked at the 26 categories of consumer goods that are most commonly sold in China, including packaged foods, beverages and personal care and home-care products. Barcode scanners were used to track the respondents' purchases.

"Chinese shoppers are pampered by having an abundance of brand choices," says Jason Yu, general manager of Kantar Worldpanel China. "Hence it is increasingly difficult for big brands to stand out from the clutter.

"It is essential for marketers to understand the nature of the categories they are competing in and make the right growth plans."

Lannes says brands that are likely to enjoy the least loyalty should run TV commercials inside stores and use similar methods to remind shoppers of their products.

Sun Tianzhen, spokeswoman for Hsu Fu Chi International Ltd, a confectionery maker, says the findings can give companies hints about how to become stronger competitors.

"Chinese people show a lot of variety in their food tastes," she says. "To inspire shoppers with brand loyalty, you have to constantly improve the quality of the food you are selling and introduce new products with fresh flavors."

Sun says it is very important to communicate with shoppers when they are in stores. To that end, the company has set up television screens in stores to inform shoppers about its production lines and food safety.

Strong loyalty

Chinese shoppers also exhibit strong brand loyalty when they buy infant formula, diapers, milk, beer, carbonated soft drinks and chewing gum, the study found.

Wang Jing, the mother of a 1-year-old, always purchases the same foreign brand of formula milk and same brand of diapers.

"There might be a risk in trying a new brand of milk powder or new brand of diapers," says Wang, 33. "As long as my son is comfortable with what he's using now, I'm not going to switch."

Another Bain study looked at shoppers who routinely buy infant products and found there was often no compelling reason to change brands. Babies, it explained, are incapable of opining about a product and mothers tend to think that continually using the same brand benefits their child's health.

For that reason, a company should try to ensure that shoppers are familiar with its brand as soon as they start shopping for a particular product.

And the strategy should be similar for companies that sell goods for which brand loyalty tends to be stronger. They also should try to encourage shoppers to try their brands first and try to ensure that their brands are easy to find in stores, Lannes says.

"Winning brands are those that are better at attracting new shoppers day-in and day-out, and that keep increasing the number of shoppers who buy their goods," he says.

Lin Shuang, a maker of traditional Chinese dresses, says she dislikes change.

"If I find a brand I like, I stay with it," she says. "But most of the time, people are forced to change brands because they aren't satisfied with what they are buying now."

 

2384 days ago
myblog


Foreign farm animals help improve breeds of cows and milk quality

The country's massive demand for milk has led to an increase in imports of dairy cattle from Australia, New Zealand and Uruguay, but that trade is expected to slow in five years, according to a leading expert.

China imported nearly 100,000 cattle from the three countries last year.

The number will keep increasing, said Li Shengli, chief scientist of the National Milk Industry Technology System and a professor at China Agricultural University.

Modern Farming Group Co Ltd, Liaoning Huishan Holdings Group and other top milk producers plan to set up dozens of large farms, he said.

Other large dairy companies have built their own farms to ensure that the quality of the milk supply remains high.

China Mengniu Dairy Co Ltd will invest 3.5 billion yuan ($549.15 million) to set up between eight and 12 dairies by 2015.

Bright Dairy and Food Co Ltd is expected to build a 130-million-yuan farm in Wuhan, Hubei province. And Inner Mongolia Yili Industrial Group Co Ltd last month opened a 220-million-yuan farm that is home to 5,000 dairy cattle.

Nestle (China) Ltd, meanwhile, set up a dairy-farming institute at its Shuangcheng fresh milk supply base in Heilongjiang province early this month. The institute operates three training farms, which work with 10,720 cows.

Not surprisingly, large farms need more cattle than small ones. Since 2009, China has been buying more of the farm animals than any other country in the world.

Last year, 52 percent of the cattle imported by the country came from Australia, 34 percent from New Zealand and 14 percent from Uruguay, according to the General Administration of Customs.

Foreign animals now make up a small proportion of the country's 14 million heads of cattle. In the future, though, it is expected that higher-yielding foreign species will help make the dairy industry more productive, professor Li said.

Li said the great demand for foreign cattle is likely to last for about five years, after which Chinese farms will have the capacity to have the overseas breeds reproduce on a large scale.

He said technology will allow farmers to ensure that the first-born calves of their overseas cows will be female, allowing them to accelerate the animals' reproduction.

Gao Lina, president of Modern Farming Group, said a faster rate of reproduction will lead the company to cease importing cattle on a large scale by the end of this year. Imported cattle have so far been used primarily as a means of producing higher quality cows.

"China does not have a shortage of cows," Gao said. "It is in need of cows that are good, a quality that is not reflected in their numbers but in their yields."

Modern Farming Group has about 150,000 cattle, most of which are imported. About 60 of them came from Australia and the rest from New Zealand and Uruguay.

Cattle inventories and milk cows' yields in China have been on the rise. Last year, the country was home to 14.4 million cattle, up 17 percent from 2008. Those animals produced 38.1 million metric tons of milk, up 0.8 percent from the same year, according to the Ministry of Agriculture.

Restricted by its resources and by environmental conditions, the industry can no longer increase its productivity merely by acquiring more cattle, Gao Hongbin, vice-minister of agriculture, said at the third dairy convention held in Zhengzhou, Henan province, on Monday.

Technological innovation is the best way to keep the quality of dairy products high, he said.

2403 days ago
myblog

China will further open its service and trade sectors, facilitating market access for competitive industries including transportation, construction and travel in the global market, a Ministry of Commerce official said on Thursday.

"The ongoing cross-border transfer of the service industry has brought China unprecedented opportunities for the service trade and China will open the industry wider," Lu Jijian, deputy director-general of the ministry's department of trade in services and commercial services, said.

Service industries including finance, logistics, education, healthcare and sports will be gradually opened, Lu said.

"The transportation, travel and construction industries could offer more market entry opportunities amid keen competition in the international service market," Lu said.

Speaking at the first China Beijing International Fair for Trade in Services held last month, World Trade Organization Director-General Pascal Lamy said that he hoped China would play a leading role in the global service industry's opening up.

Accounting for about 70 percent of the world economy, the service sector is responsible for two-thirds of global transnational investment and one-fifth of world trade.

"With the repercussions of the international economic crisis still lingering, major economies are racing to upgrade their economic development modes," Lu said.

"China will expand exports of services, including construction, labor, transportation, communication, finance and consulting, to introduce premium Chinese services to foreign markets," Lu said.

According to the ministry, China will promote the proportion of trade in modern services with high added value in its total services exports to 45 percent by 2015.

China ranked fourth in the world in service trade value, totaling $419.1 billion last year, compared with $66 billion in 2000.

"However, compared with developed economies, China is still weak at market exploration and the establishment of international sales channels," Lu said.

In developed economies, the service sector represents about 70 percent of the total economy. In China, the figure is just about 43 percent. By 2015, China's service trade will reach $600 billion and the industry will account for 47 percent of GDP.

2408 days ago
myblog

China will further open its service and trade sectors, facilitating market access for competitive industries including transportation, construction and travel in the global market, a Ministry of Commerce official said on Thursday.

"The ongoing cross-border transfer of the service industry has brought China unprecedented opportunities for the service trade and China will open the industry wider," Lu Jijian, deputy director-general of the ministry's department of trade in services and commercial services, said.

Service industries including finance, logistics, education, healthcare and sports will be gradually opened, Lu said.

"The transportation, travel and construction industries could offer more market entry opportunities amid keen competition in the international service market," Lu said.

Speaking at the first China Beijing International Fair for Trade in Services held last month, World Trade Organization Director-General Pascal Lamy said that he hoped China would play a leading role in the global service industry's opening up.

Accounting for about 70 percent of the world economy, the service sector is responsible for two-thirds of global transnational investment and one-fifth of world trade.

"With the repercussions of the international economic crisis still lingering, major economies are racing to upgrade their economic development modes," Lu said.

"China will expand exports of services, including construction, labor, transportation, communication, finance and consulting, to introduce premium Chinese services to foreign markets," Lu said.

According to the ministry, China will promote the proportion of trade in modern services with high added value in its total services exports to 45 percent by 2015.

China ranked fourth in the world in service trade value, totaling $419.1 billion last year, compared with $66 billion in 2000.

"However, compared with developed economies, China is still weak at market exploration and the establishment of international sales channels," Lu said.

In developed economies, the service sector represents about 70 percent of the total economy. In China, the figure is just about 43 percent. By 2015, China's service trade will reach $600 billion and the industry will account for 47 percent of GDP.

2408 days ago
myblog

CHINA'S logistics industry is burdened by high costs and low credibility which will harm efforts to expand, according to an industry survey yesterday.

The costs of logistics in the country account for 18 percent of China's gross domestic product, or double those of the US and Europe, the survey, released by the Global Supply Chain Council, said.

"The low efficiency in using trucks and poor connections are responsible for the high costs and curbing the industry's growth," said Martin Thaysen, executive vice president of CEVA Logistics which did the survey together with the council.

The survey interviewed 177 high-ranking officials and executives from various industries, including automobile, industrial equipment, apparel and fast moving consumer goods, who need reliable logistic services in China.

Some 49 percent of them said high cost and reliability are the biggest problem in the domestic logistics industry.

More than 30 percent of them said they were dissatisfied with the country's logistic services and over 60 percent of the dissatisfaction was related to bad services and low credibility.

Poor infrastructure and high prices were the second and third major dissatisfactions. Some 28 percent of the firms complained domestic logistic providers failed to adapt to their particular circumstances.

See also http://supplychain.asia/2012/05/the-state-of-logistics-in-china/

2416 days ago
myblog

CHINA'S logistics industry is burdened by high costs and low credibility which will harm efforts to expand, according to an industry survey yesterday.

The costs of logistics in the country account for 18 percent of China's gross domestic product, or double those of the US and Europe, the survey, released by the Global Supply Chain Council, said.

"The low efficiency in using trucks and poor connections are responsible for the high costs and curbing the industry's growth," said Martin Thaysen, executive vice president of CEVA Logistics which did the survey together with the council.

The survey interviewed 177 high-ranking officials and executives from various industries, including automobile, industrial equipment, apparel and fast moving consumer goods, who need reliable logistic services in China.

Some 49 percent of them said high cost and reliability are the biggest problem in the domestic logistics industry.

More than 30 percent of them said they were dissatisfied with the country's logistic services and over 60 percent of the dissatisfaction was related to bad services and low credibility.

Poor infrastructure and high prices were the second and third major dissatisfactions. Some 28 percent of the firms complained domestic logistic providers failed to adapt to their particular circumstances.

See also http://supplychain.asia/2012/05/the-state-of-logistics-in-china/

2416 days ago
myblog

CHINA'S logistics industry is burdened by high costs and low credibility which will harm efforts to expand, according to an industry survey yesterday.
The costs of logistics in the country account for 18 percent of China's gross domestic product, or double those of the US and Europe, the survey, released by the Global Supply Chain Council, said.
"The low efficiency in using trucks and poor connections are responsible for the high costs and curbing the industry's growth," said Martin Thaysen, executive vice president of CEVA Logistics which did the survey together with the council.
The survey interviewed 177 high-ranking officials and executives from various industries, including automobile, industrial equipment, apparel and fast moving consumer goods, who need reliable logistic services in China.
Some 49 percent of them said high cost and reliability are the biggest problem in the domestic logistics industry.
More than 30 percent of them said they were dissatisfied with the country's logistic services and over 60 percent of the dissatisfaction was related to bad services and low credibility.
Poor infrastructure and high prices were the second and third major dissatisfactions. Some 28 percent of the firms complained domestic logistic providers failed to adapt to their particular circumstances.

See also http://supplychain.asia/2012/05/the-state-of-logistics-in-china/

2416 days ago

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My Contacts

Home Address
999, Ning Qiao Road
City
Shanghai
Postal Code
201206
Country
China
Phone Number
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Mobile Number
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My Company
My China B2B
Work Address
999, Ning Qiao Road
Website
http://www.mychinab2b.net
Department
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